Course Descriptions

 

While many students have a notion that honors courses are, by default, harder, we always say that honors classes are different. With an average class size of just 17 students, honors classes allow students to have far more interaction with their professors and fellow students; in turn, this allows professors to design their classes to revolve around discussion and active learning rather than lectures and tests.

The Honors College offers two types of honors courses that are available to all honors students. Liberal Studies honors sections (LBST-H), which also fulfill general education requirements, and honors topics seminars (HONR 3700), upper-level discussion-intensive courses.

Please note, you must be enrolled in the University Honors Program, Business Honors Program, Levine Scholars Program, Crown Scholars Program, Martin Scholars Program, Art + Architecture Honors Program or have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey (Office Administrator) at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  

Fall 2022 Schedule of classes

Honors College

LBST 1101 – H71 (CRN#17042)           Arts & Society: Dance (HONR)
Sarkar, Kaustavi                                   Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:05 – 9:55 am
 
Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program, Business Honors Program, Levine Scholars Program, Crown Scholars Program, Martin Scholars Program, Art + Architecture Honors Program or have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  “Diaspora and Identity through Dance in South Asia” – In this course, students will focus on dance as cultural mobility and identity. Deepening their understanding on the diaspora, its formation, sustenance, and proliferation, this course will allow students to appreciate the role of performance in cultural formation. Diasporic artists often create a sense of nostalgic belonging to their home countries. Focusing on South Asian artists who work in the urban diaspora of Charlotte, students will learn historical, geographical, and cultural precepts of how identity and performance are integrally connected.
LBST 1105 – H72 (CRN#12795)        Arts & Society:  Visual Arts (HONR)
Pereira, Malin                                     Thursday 2:00 – 4:45 pm
 
Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College. To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. "Inquiry into the Visual Arts" In this course, we will conduct an individual and group inquiry into the visual arts. We will visit a range of art events, museums, galleries and public spaces, aiming to experience and investigate a range of artistic expression from the classical to the experimental and from a variety of cultural perspectives. Assignments will require attendance, academic research, reflection, writing and discussion. Most activities will fit our Thursday afternoon class time, but there may be one or two substitutions, all of which will be on the course calendar the first day of class. This course will be held at The Dubois Center in Uptown Charlotte. Light rail transportation to the 9th St campus is free and highly recommended; students with main campus parking will be able to park there.
LBST 2101 – H73 (CRN#13562)        Western History & Culture (HONR)
McDaniel, Janet                                  Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 – 2:15 pm

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  "Breaking Boundaries:  Struggles for Equity" - Breaking Boundaries will introduce you to an evolution of ideas between Christianity, society, and social change.  You will examine and evaluate systemic barriers in Western Civilization and efforts taken to dismantle them. A component of this class will be participating in a Reacting to the Past Game (RTTP):  Greenwich Village, 1913: Suffrage, Labor, and the New Woman. RTTP are historical role-playing games where you as a student “inhabit” a character and express that character’s viewpoint. Greenwich Village, 1913 focuses on major issues facing a rapidly industrialized nation: women demanding legal rights and social reforms, labor unions demanding changes in work conditions and limiting corporate power, African Americans combating disenfranchisement, and bohemians who challenge views on marriage, sexuality, and the family. After the game, you will continue the journey investigating struggles toward equity with race, gender, marriage, and the workforce.
LBST 2102Q – H74 (CRN#15776)     Global Connections (HONR)
Thorsheim, Peter                               Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:10 – 11:00 am
 
Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.This course is for incoming Freshman only. The Paradoxical 20th Century: Since 1900 the world has changed at an unprecedented rate. In many ways, these changes have brought progress, including new discoveries in science and technology, advances in civil rights, national independence for people once under foreign rule, and higher standards of living and longer life expectancies for many. Yet these changes have also brought tragedy, such as entrenched poverty, deadly epidemics, two world wars and hundreds of smaller ones, numerous cases of genocide, environmental damage, terrorism, and the threat of nuclear war. This course aims to help you make sense of the paradoxical 20th century and to explore how it affects today's world. In addition, it is designed to help you improve key skills needed to succeed as a university student and in your future career, including critical thinking, active reading, effective note taking, clear writing, and global awareness. LBST 2102 may not be repeated for credit. This is a Prospect for Success Course designed to help new students develop their commitment to success, inquiry skills, and cultural awareness during their first semester at UNCC. This is an honors course; as such, special assignments and activities such as field trips uptown will be added by the professor.
LBST 2212 – H75 (CRN#17146)        Literature & Culture (HONR)
Ornat, Natalie                                    Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
 
Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  “Literature and Culture: Reading Banned Books.” 
This course will examine the world of banned and challenged literature. Students will read from a variety of books that have been banned or challenged in the United States and investigate the reasons why groups attempt to censor these texts in schools, libraries, and prisons. We will trace the history of book banning in the U.S., the movement for intellectual freedom, and examine how challenges reflect societal anxieties. This course will pay special attention to the targeting of literature written by authors of diverse backgrounds.
LBST 2213 – H70 (CRN#17171)           Science, Technology, and Society (HONR)
Howden, Reuben                                  Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. .  “Intersections of Science and Society” This course addresses some of the relationships between science, technology, and societies, including the cultures of science and how they relate to society, federal funding for science, public understanding of science, as well as trust and mistrust of science, competition among scientists, using science to improve life, and some contemporary topics.  The course will be conducted as a seminar. That means that we will discuss each week’s topics together. There will be times when I present additional material, but we will use the assigned readings as the basis of each week’s discussion.  This course is designed for students in the Honors College. Therefore, it is presumed that students will have experience with formulating and presenting ideas.
LBST 2301 – H76 (CRN#12797)        Critical Thinking & Comm (HONR)
Lewis, Erin                                           Wednesday 4:00 – 6:45 pm
             
Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. “Multiculturalisms, Citizenship, Schools, and Society.” -  A study of multicultural perspectives and insights on the concept of citizenship through the lens of education and society. Discussions, reading, and seminars explore cultural and national identity representations in school curricula, literature, and digital media with an emphasis on cultural competence and culturally responsive strategies. Includes a service component that allows students to explore the relations of citizenship and public service. Students enrolled attend seminar meetings, complete up to 40 hours of service in the community and develop a final portfolio. All service opportunities will be planned in accordance with University guidance on public health and safety.
LBST 2301 – H77 (CRN#15834)        Critical Thinking & Comm (HONR)
Steele, Lucy                                         Tuesday 2:30 – 5:15 pm
 
Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  “Studies in Citizenship: The Theory & Practice of Community Engagement, Service, and Activism.” – In this course, students will study the concept of citizenship through readings, class discussions, and community engagement activities. Freire (1998), in describing critical learning, notes that “learners will be engaged in a continuous transformation through which they become authentic subjects of the construction and reconstruction of what is being taught, side by side with the teacher, who is equally subject to the same process (p. 33). This course will focus on the concept of critical service-learning, beginning with an exploration of privilege, identity, and matrices of oppression. We will explore community engagement, service-learning, and activism and engage in academic inquiry and research with the goals of contributing to academic conversation, highlighting social issues and solutions, and reflecting on our own experiences, identities, and work as citizens.
LBST 2301 – H78 (CRN#13014)        Critical Thinking & Comm (HONR)
Keener, Andrew                                 Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 am – 12:45 pm


Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. .  “Identity, Belonging, and Citizenship” - This course offers a series of opportunities to think critically and practice process-oriented communication on the subjects of identity, belonging, and citizenship, particularly the forms – social forms, but also in writing, speech, art, film, and theater – that bring them into being. Along with seminar discussions, activities, and projects, this course also includes a service component that permits synthesis between theoretical discussions and engaged, public-oriented action.

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LBST 2301 – H79 (CRN#17456)        Critical Thinking & Comm (HONR)
Boyd, Jordan                                       Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  “Race, Class, Education, and Culture in Today’s America” - In this course, students will study the concept of citizenship with an emphasis on the ways in which race, class, education, and culture act as key variables in the subject’s multifacetedness. Discussions, readings, and reflective journal entries will engage the historical, ethical, and sociopolitical foundations of citizenship and the issues such as poverty, educational opportunity, and social mobility. The course includes a service component that allows students to explore the relationship between citizenship and public service. All service opportunities will be planned in accordance with University guidance on public health and safety. 
HONR 2720 – H01 (CRN#17170)      Competitive Scholarship Workshop
Keener, Andrew                                  Mondays 1:30 – 2:15
 
Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program, Business Honors Program, Levine Scholars Program, Crown Scholars Program, Martin Scholars Program, Art + Architecture Honors Program or have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. This course provides students a supportive workshop environment for researching, drafting, developing, and revising material towards nationally competitive scholarships. Activities and assignments include academic resumes, personal statements, research statements, frequently-appearing short-answer questions, and interviewing practice. By the end of the course, students will have developed a strong set of application materials that can be repurposed for multiple scholarship opportunities, and which are also relevant to internship and job searches
HONR 3700 – H01 (CRN#15132)      Honors College Topics:  The City on Film
Forget, Thomas                                   Tuesday 2:30 – 5:15 pm
 
Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program, Business Honors Program, Levine Scholars Program, Crown Scholars Program, Martin Scholars Program, Art + Architecture Honors Program or have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  This course explores the special historical relationship between film and the city in order to consider how new media are shaping the contemporary city. The historical relationship between film and the city helps us to scrutinize changes occurring within the contemporary city enacted by the emergence of new types of media that represent it. The relationship between media and city is posited as both material and social. Media literally shape our cities, but they also infiltrate our everyday habits of perception, communication, and knowledge-building. Students in the course apply lessons learned through readings and screenings toward projects rooted in Charlotte and their particular interests in urban matters. The course involves local field trips and case studies, using the city as a learning laboratory.
HONR 3700 – H02 (CRN#13293)      Honors College Topics:  Identity, Elections, and Representation
Windett, Jason                                    Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:20 – 1:10 pm

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  Broadly speaking, this seminar places identity and social difference at center stage in political science research on democracy in the United States. Grounded in research developed within social and political theory, students will be exposed to various concerns pertaining to the role of identity in the public sphere. We will explore the history, research findings, and current academic debates about the role of identity in American politics at both the national and subnational level. We will examine work on public opinion, voting behavior, electoral politics, legislative studies, public policy, and social movements as they apply to a critical analysis of identity. The focus on identity-based issues and discrimination also intersects with other politically-relevant categories, such as geography, class, and ideological and partisan identification.
HONR 3700 – H03 (CRN#12291)      Honors College Topics:  Creativity and Creative Problem Solving
Gilson, Cindy                                       Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 – 11:15 am
 
Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  This course introduces the concept of creativity and explores how it can facilitate student success in their future careers and professions across a variety of disciplines. Major topics include characteristics of creative individuals, theories/research about creativity, and strategies for thinking creatively. A key emphasis in the course is on the application of the Creative Problem Solving process to a student-selected real-world problem.
HONR 3700 – H04 (CRN#14836)      Honors College Topics:  Urban Development and Racial Inequality
Miller, Candace                                  Wednesday 2:00 – 4:45 pm

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu. This seminar examines the link between historical and contemporary urban development and racial inequality in U.S. cities, with a particular focus on development processes occurring in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg County metropolitan area. The course will introduce and examine racial inequality as a factor shaping and shaped by urban processes including, but not limited to, urban renewal, gentrification, suburbanization, and migration.
HONR 3700 – H05 (CRN#11192)      Honors College Topics: Leadership:  Theory and Practice
Adnot, Mindy                                      Monday 2:30 – 5:15 pm
 
Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  In this course, we will examine leadership theories from multiple disciplinary perspectives including psychology, management, political science and communication studies. How do conceptualizations of a “good leader” vary across fields? Students will be asked to develop an interdisciplinary framework for leadership by drawing together ideas from across disciplinary boundaries, and to put these ideas into practice as discussion leaders for the University Honors Program’s Colloquium course (HONR 1700). By engaging in a cycle of study, application, and reflection, students will develop their leadership identity and build their capacity for effectively facilitating discussion in a peer learning community.  Permission of the instructor (through application) is required.
HONR 3700 – H06 (CRN#13601)      Honors College Topics: The Art of Applying Universal Skills: Crucial Tools for Life and Work
Savage, Dylan                                      Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 – 9:45 am

Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  In this unique, interdisciplinary course, students will learn how to apply eight universal skills essential to achieving success (collaboration, communication, creativity, critical-thinking, focus, improvisation, patience, and problem-solving) to their academic majors and future professional and personal lives as well. By learning the critical process of integrating these skills into their work and lives, students will begin to experience the varied components of their world as a vital, dynamic whole -- intrinsically and beautifully interconnected. Fundamental to this course is the instructor’s demonstration of each universal skill through his live performance at the piano. By observing how a concert pianist applies this process to practice and performance, students learn to re-imagine the integration and connection of these skills into their own work and lives. Students are expected to participate in classroom discussions, give presentations, and keep a comprehensive journal which charts their journey of discovery through this course. This is not a music course; no music background required.
ECON 2101 – H01 (CRN#11367)       Principles of Economics-Macro
Amato, Ted                                          Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 am – 11:15 am
 
Must be enrolled in Honors (AAHP, BHP, UHP, or departmental) OR in one of the following Scholars programs: Albert, Crown, Freeman, Johnson, Levine or Martin; OR have permission of the Honors College.  To obtain permission please contact Shannon Zurell-Carey at shannonzurell@uncc.edu.  Scope and methodology of economics as a social science, the measurement of national income, the theory of national income determination, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy, and international economics.

Recommended honors writing sections for students needing WRDS 1103. Does not count as honors credit for UHP.

WRDS 1103 – H01 (CRN#14439)                      Writing and Inquiry in Academic Contexts I & II
Campbell, Malcolm                                           Tuesday and Thursday 10:00 – 11:15 am

In this course, students write extensively as they explore literacy and writing. They engage critically with the opinions and voices of others while developing an extended inquiry project that integrates materials from varied sources and includes writing in multiple genres. Students write, revise, edit, and reflect on their writing with the support of the teacher and peers. Students also immerse themselves in a conversation about a topic through reading, questioning, and process writing. Students learn to distinguish rhetorical contexts, practice different conventions, and develop positions in relation to research. They also adopt digital technologies to network, compose, and/or critique and disseminate their work. 
WRDS 1103 – H02 (CRN#14440)                      Writing and Inquiry in Academic Contexts I & II
Campbell, Malcolm                                           Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 am – 12:45 pm

In this course, students write extensively as they explore literacy and writing. They engage critically with the opinions and voices of others while developing an extended inquiry project that integrates materials from varied sources and includes writing in multiple genres. Students write, revise, edit, and reflect on their writing with the support of the teacher and peers. Students also immerse themselves in a conversation about a topic through reading, questioning, and process writing. Students learn to distinguish rhetorical contexts, practice different conventions, and develop positions in relation to research. They also adopt digital technologies to network, compose, and/or critique and disseminate their work. 

University Honors Program

HONR 1700 – H01 (CRN#13069)        University Honors Program Colloquium
Lynch, Denise                                        Wednesday 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm

Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program. Introduces University Honors Program (UHP) students to scholarship, community engagement, and leadership opportunities within the Honors, University, and Greater Charlotte communities. The class format is inquiry and discussion driven. Students participate in an experiential learning opportunity through the National Collegiate Honors Council’s City as Text™ program. This course is offered only in the Fall semester for incoming UHP students.
HONR 1700 – H02 (CRN#13068)        University Honors Program Colloquium
Lynch, Denise                                        Thursday 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
 
Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program. Introduces University Honors Program (UHP) students to scholarship, community engagement, and leadership opportunities within the Honors, University, and Greater Charlotte communities. The class format is inquiry and discussion driven. Students participate in an experiential learning opportunity through the National Collegiate Honors Council’s City as Text™ program. This course is offered only in the Fall semester for incoming UHP students.
HONR 1700 – H03 (CRN#13071)        University Honors Program Colloquium
Lynch, Denise                                        Friday 12:20 pm – 1:35 pm
 
Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program. Introduces University Honors Program (UHP) students to scholarship, community engagement, and leadership opportunities within the Honors, University, and Greater Charlotte communities. The class format is inquiry and discussion driven. Students participate in an experiential learning opportunity through the National Collegiate Honors Council’s City as Text™ program. This course is offered only in the Fall semester for incoming UHP students.
HONR 3790 – H01 (CRN#11995)      University Honors Program Senior Seminar
Adnot, Mindy                                      Wednesday 1:00 – 2:15 pm

Must be enrolled in the University Honors Program.  Focuses on development of a proposal for the University Honors Program (UHP) senior capstone project in consultation with an honors faculty committee selected by the student. Project proposals are submitted through the Application to Candidacy process for approval by the Honors College.  The course is offered only in the Fall semester for students planning to graduate the following Spring or Fall semester. 

Previous Course Listings

Curious about previous honors courses? The links below are to honors course listings from previous semesters. Some courses may be offered again in future semesters.